Professor
Slane College of Communications and Fine Arts
Department of Interactive Media
and Department of Communication
Bradley University--Peoria IL 61625
GCC315; (309) 677-2378 ell@bradley.edu/FaceTime; Skype: dredleelam

IM 355 01 & 02: Interactive Media Theories, Concepts, and Practices

Fall, 2019
GCC 104
01:9-10:15am
02:3-4:15pm
and online

Goals and Objectives
Requirements/Expectations
Grading
Special Considerations
Flexible Schedule
The Concepts


Course Goals and Objectives

Goals:

(1) To examine and develop concepts & ideas derived from scholarship about human communication, mass media, and computational digital technologies. New media theory comes from diverse and interdisciplinary sources.

(2) To examine and develop conceptual foundations derived from the cultural and commercial dimensions of new media history and technologies. Much new media theory is derived from professional practice, including contemporary/everyday phenomena. Ongoing technological innovations and implementations variously conform to and challenge conceptual understandings and explanations. The course examines the everyday, bringing focus to the taken-for-granted, and testing disciplinary/scholarly knowledge.

(3) To provide you with increased and improved technical vocabularies with which to study and discuss conceptual developments.

(4) Developing critical insights about taken-for-granted new media phenomena. Students are encouraged to think critically about the roles of media (new and old) in their lives as well as in our cultures.

(5) To develop informed speculations concerning the future of new media with particular attention to the roles of citizens, consumers, and producers. To the degree that “the new media are us,” the course encourages increased awareness, self-consciousness, and a critical attitude toward participation in mediated communication.

(6) This course fulfills a BU Core Curricula Writing Intensive (WI) requirement.

Objectives:

In order to meet these goals, you develop the ability to comprehend, identify, apply, and critically evaluate the definitions of the concepts. In the case of the core concepts presented in lecture/discussion and web notes, you should be able to:

  • write the definitions of the concepts and of their subparts;

  • compare and contrast aspects of the concepts & subparts among each other in order to explain the differences/similarities among them;

  • observe, identify, and illustrate the concepts and subparts in news/media reports of industry developments (not including personal opinion-based, amateur blogs).

In the case of the reading materials, students should be able to:

  • specify the author’s theses for each chapter/section;

  • identify the claims and sub-claims the authors make;

  • identify the evidence the authors use;

  • make claims about the readings;
  • support your claims about the readings with evidence from the readings;
  • summarize the readings.

Requirements and Expectations

Fall 2019 IM 355 will happen, mostly, online.
We will meet, 3 times, face-to-face in GCC 104: the first class day and for the two exams (listed on the syllabus).
Face-to-Face attendence is MANDATORY those 3 days.

Follow the syllabus/schedule: read the book, read the concept pages, watch the video concept lectures, do the summary assignments over the book and the concept application notes over the concepts.

Due dates and times are listed on the syllabus. The online version of the syllabus will be updated, when needed, and supersedes the printed version.

Graded course elements include: (A) exams over the concepts [2]; (B) "concept application notes" over the concepts [21] (C) Reading summary reviews [24] over the book, (D) 6, 9, or 12-page research paper (topics, first come first serve, on the wiki; see details below). Due dates are listed on the syllabus.
Each is detailed below.

(A) The Concept Exams

Face-to-Face Attendance Required:
The
 Midterm Exam (concepts 1-10), in GCC 104, October 8, 01=9-10:15; 02=3-4:15.
Final Exam (concepts 11-21) in GCC 104: 01= December 16, 9-11 am; 02= December 17, 9-11 am. 

If you begin the final exam on time you may use the 2 hours. You may not show up late and expect to be able to use 2 hours. I will only stay longer than 1 hour for someone who was on time. Most students finish inside 1 hour.

No early or make-up exams will be arranged for either of the exams. Students with emergencies must contact Dr. Lamoureux (in person or by phone) before the end of the test period; accommodations will be made for (only) dire emergencies. Students needing accommodations from the Learning Assistance Center must contact both the center and me a minimum of one full, 7-day, week before the exam. Do not make travel plans that conflict with either examination.

(B) Concept application notes

Each class day that we deal with the (21) course concepts, you will post a one-or-two-page (400-800 words) "concept application note" to the Sakai forum. The post must:

1) summarize ALL OF THE PARTS of the concept
2) summarize the assigned article
3) Apply the article to part of the concept or part of the concept to the article

Please mark each of the three steps and separate them by line spaces. Your answer should have three discreet parts.

Summarize your understanding of the concept BEFORE you do the application to the article. Restate the concept in your own words. DO NOT JUST CUT AND PASTE WHAT I'VE WRITTEN OR SAID. I need for you to show, clearly, that you understand the concept by, first, being able to describe it. Some of the concepts have multiple parts. Summarize the whole, first, then use whichever part of the concept you think best applies to the article(s).

After summarizing the concept, briefly summarize the article. Concept applications must be drawn from the article I indicate at the bottom of the concept notes.

Finally, make the application of article to concept or concept to article. The activity does NOT call for third summary. The treatment MUST either apply the concept to the article or apply the reading to the concept. The note must clarify the concept, the article, and (especially) their connection. Do not write: "the article applies to the concept because they are about the same thing(s)" or "the article is an example of the concept." I know those: I selected the article because it relates to the concept. The question is: HOW? Or, "what can you tell me about the ways that one modifies, contradicts, expands" the other?

I may share especially interesting notes with the class. Do not use any of the illustrations that I use in lecture or that appear in the book. Concept application notes are graded and scored for quality. Concept applications are posted to forums in Sakai (not attached). Use the "paste into" function in Sakai to avoid entering machine code. Concept applications are due before 11:59pm the day the concept is listed on the syllabus. An additional 12 hour grace period is allowed. I will not grade application notes submitted later than 12 noon following the due day.

You cannot see concept application notes that you post to Sakai forums until after I've graded them and notified the class. Keep a copy for your records.

(C) Text book reading summaries/analyses (200-400 words).

Summaries/analyses are posted to Sakai (DO NOT ATTACH a DOC. THERE; use the Sakai "paste into" function or enter the text into Sakai), one summary/analysis per chapter or page range, as assigned. Each day's assignment will specify particular learning outcome(s) and foci for your summary/analysis. Reading assignments are due by 8am the morning of the class day on the syllabus schedule. An additional 12 hour grace period is allowed. I will not grade application notes submitted later than 8 pm on the due day.

You cannot see reading summaries that you post to Sakai forums until after I've graded them and notified the class. Keep a copy for your records.

(D) Research/Writing Project (in three parts, outline, rough draft, final paper):

You must select (and cannot change) one of three options for the research/writing project: (C): a 6-page final paper; (B): an 9-page final paper; (A): a 12-page final paper. The designations DO NOT mean that your paper will automatically receive an A, B, OR C.

You "declare" which option you are using when you turn in your outline.
Normally, You may not change paper options after turning in the outline.
You may only change topics (a) if there is one available and (b) if you complete and turn in a new/second outline no later than 1 full week (7 days) prior to the due date for the draft.

Values for the outline and rough draft are the same for all versions; values for the final paper vary, based on option. 70 points will be entered as the "base" score for the final paper assignment. Option (C) final papers are worth up to 50; Option (B) final papers are worth up to 75; Option (A) final papers are worth up to 100 points.

Each paper (outline/draft/final) must start with (1) project type (C, B, A) (2) The assigned topic (copy and paste the full topic specification from the Sakai wiki), (3) the title of YOUR paper, and (4) your name.

Rough drafts and final papers MUST feature sections with content-specific section headings, main points organized by one of the patterns presented in class, and bib/ref section using the specified/modified MLA

Drafts without sections with section headings, main points organized by one of the patterns presented in class, and without properly formatted evidence and bibliographic citations [including URLs for retrieving web materials at the point you found them] will receive a zero, will be returned without critical commentary, and the "late submission" clock will start running from the time I return the paper.

Final papers without the materials indicated above will receive a zero, without opportunity for redemption.

Submit outlines as an email attachment, directly to me. Draft and final papers are posted to the Assignments section on Sakai. All three portions of the project must be turned in and graded in order for you to pass the course.

I set up the draft and final paper assignments using "Turnitin.". Turnitin checks for source and documentation issues (plagiarism, copying, and proper documentation, etc.). Your papers are submitted to our intuitional repository (we do NOT submit your papers to the external Turnitin repository). Submitting your papers to me gives me explicit permission to submit your papers to this repository for our continued use for this purpose at BU. I might also use your paper(s) as examples in this or future classes. When I use your paper as an example, I'll remove your name.

All sources should be carefully documented, and included in each assignment file, using the modified MLA style.

There are NO GRACE PERIODS for the 3 parts of the paper.
Papers for the first two steps are reduced by one full letter grade per 24 hours after the due date/time for each portion (full sentence outline & rough draft). Only students with a documented, completed, graded, and returned, full sentence outline may turn in a rough draft; only students with a completed, graded, and returned, rough draft may turn in the final paper. The first two parts (full sentence outlines & drafts) will NOT be accepted more than 4 calendar days after the due date. If a paper is not turned in by then, you must drop the course or receive an "F." Students must complete the term paper assignment in order to pass the class. Skipping any of the three phases of the paper will result in course failure, regardless of point accumulation. Final papers will only be accepted on time, as scheduled.

Turn in .doc or .docx documents.
I do NOT accept Google Docs, Pages documents, .pdf files, or any other file types.
If you do not own a copy of Microsoft Word, arrange for document translation to WORD in the library or other work station.
When you translate to WORD, be sure to look over its "auto-correction" mark-up and make the necessary changes.

I return the papers (to your Sakai dropbox for 355) via a WORD document with review COMMENTS. I sometimes add an mp3 file. Be sure that you read and listen to all of my comments.

Title the files (save or save as) according to the naming convention:"yourlastname_outline.docx"/"yourlastname_draft.docx"/"yourlastname_final.dox"
Papers turned in with improper file names will be returned, ungraded, zero credit, late clock ticking.

Don't forget that our library features kind and knowledgeable librarians who are expert at suggesting effective/efficient research strategies. You should take advantage of their expertise. Kari Garman is our CFA librarian; others are also very helpful.

Also remember that, in many instances, print resources are superior to materials found online. Research materials found using our academic databases are far superior to resources found using a basic web search. Using Google Scholar search from the library page often returns higher quality, academic, research than a general web search.

(E) Class discussion: (5)

There will be 5 discussion threads in the term. Credit will be given for quality and quantity of participation. Full credit will be give only if you make one unique contribution AND at least three coherent comments on other students' posts (per assigned question). The discussion topics are posted to matching Forum items.

Extra Credit:

You may earn up to 50 extra credit points by completing full sentence outlines of up to 5 chapters from the extra credit books (summaries will NOT be accepted; full sentence outlines of individual chapters, up to five, at 10 points each). NO CREDIT FOR PREFACE, INTRODUCTION, FORWARD, OR CONCLUSION; "Regular"-numbered chapters only. The extra credit work may be turned in at a rate of no more than ONE PER WEEK (Sunday-Saturday), no later than 8am December 8. Plan ahead and do extra credit work along the way; do not leave it until the end.

Required Text:

Shoshana Zuboff. The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The fight for a human future at the new frontier of Power. Hachette Book Group, 2019.

OPTIONAL extra credit books: (optional means you DO NOT HAVE TO PURCHASE these! Look at them in a library or bookstore, check them out from a library, or find a chapter online).

Grading:

Reading Summaries/analysis (24@11 ea.):------------264
Concept application notes (21@11 ea.):-----------------231
Exam 1: (Concepts 1-10)-------------------------------------120
Exam 2: (Concepts 11-20)-----------------------------------100
Term Paper, Full sentence outline & bib:----------------50
Term Paper rough draft & bib:------------------------------70
Term Paper complete:---------------------------------------- 70
Discussion Thread Participation (5@20 ea.):---------100
Total------------------------------------------------------------1005
(final total could be more or fewer points; grades are based on percentages of final points possible)

A: 88.5%-100%; B:88.4-78.5; C: 78.4-68.5; D: 68.4-58.5; F:<58.5

Special Considerations

There is a Sakai site for grades and for your concept application notes, summaries, and class email. .

I do not use text messaging, so each of the 3 days that we are in GCC 104, one student, each day, will be identified as the "designated emergency text message monitor" and will be asked to leave their cell phone on for this purpose. You must be registered with the BU emergency notification system to serve. Please help me identify this person in a timely fasion. All other cell phones should be turned to vibrate or off during those 3 sessions.

All students are responsible to the same syllabus schedule, regardless of outside or BU-sponsored activities. I only accept materials early by agreement. Missing assignments must be thoroughly documented and arrangements made BEFORE THE CLASS IN QUESTION in order to qualify for exception. Medical issues, see below.

In accordance with University procedures, if you have a documented disability and require accommodations to obtain equal access in this course, you must be registered with Student Access Services located at 100 Heitz Hall. You can reach the SAS at (309) 677-3654 or find more information at the Student Access Services website [http://www.bradley.edu/offices/student/sas/ ]. Generally, the service requires advanced notice for arrangements; please contact them now.

"Official" office hours, Tuesday & Thursday, 1030-11:30 am, are held in GCC 315 or by FaceTime teleconference OR by appointment.

Please do not call (home, 309-672-5878; cell 309-635-2605) after 8pm unless there is an emergency. My e-mail/FaceTime address: <ell@bradley.edu>; skype: dredleelam. I do not use text messaging.

When fully face-to-face, this course requires a minimum of 2 hours of school work, per day, Monday-Friday. Online enrollment will probably NOT lower that time and effort commitment/expectation significantly.

 


Flexible Schedule:

August

29 class 1
GCC 104. Face-to-Face Attendance Required.
01= 9-10:15am; 02= 3-4:15pm.
Material also available online as class 1.
In Class: Introduction to class procedures including sample reading assignment & sample concept application note.
Due by 11:59pm: sample reading assignment & sample concept application note (treat intro material as the concept, treat the hype cycle material as the reading; integrate them).
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 16 and turn in summary with take away; Study Concept 1 material.

September

3 class 2
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 16, Summary with take away.
For Class: Concept 1.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 1 application note.
For next class: Read, Surveillance Capitalism, Introduction/Chapter 1 and turn in summary and thesis analysis; Study Concept 2 material.

5 class 3
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, Introduction/Chapter 1 summary and thesis analysis.
For Class: Concept 2.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 2 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 2, pp. 27-top of 46 and do Claim analysis summary. Study Concept 3 material.

10 class 4
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 2, pp. 27-top of 46 Claim analysis summary.
For Class: Concept 3.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 3 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 2, pp. 46-62, Evidence analysis summary; Study Concept 4 material.

12 class 5
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 2, pp. 46-62, Evidence analysis summary.
For Class: Concept 4.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 4 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 3 and do Full sentence outline (3 levels deep). Study Concept 5 material.

Discussion Thread, Topic One, Due by 5pm Sept. 15.

17 class 6
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 3 Full sentence outline (3 levels deep).
For Class: Concept 5.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 5 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 4, pp. 98-112 and do analysis of the relationships among sets of points; Study Concept 6 material.

19 class 7
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 4, pp. 98-112: analysis of the relationships among sets of points.
For Class: Concept 6.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 6 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 4, pp. 112-127 and do Your thesis and claims analysis summary; Study Concept 7 material.

22 Extra credit 1 (pacing)
Project/Paper Topics must be selected by September 24.

24 class 8
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 4, pp. 112-127, Your thesis and claims analysis summary.
For Class: Concept 7.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 7 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 5, pp. 128-148, and do Your evidence analysis summary; Study Concept 8 material.

26 class 9
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 5, pp. 128-148, Your evidence analysis summary.
For Class: Concept 8.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 8 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 5, pp. 148-175 and organize YOUR thesis and main points into three organizational patterns; Study Concept 9 material.

October

1 class 10
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 5, pp. 148-175, organize Your thesis and main points into three organizational patterns.
For Class: Concept 9.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 9 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 6 and complete For S. C. 6. Study Concept 10 material.

3 class 11
Due by 8am
Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 6, For S. C. 6.
For Class: Concept 10.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 10 application note.
For next class: Study for Midterm Exam, Concepts 1-10.

6 Extra credit 2 (pacing)
Discussion Thread, Topic Two, Due by 5pm Oct. 6.

8 class 12
GCC 104. Face-to-Face Attendance Required.
01= 9-10:15am; 02= 3-4:15pm.
MID TERM EXAM: Concepts 1-10.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 7, pp. 199-212 and complete for_s_c_7_199-212; Study Concept 11material.

10 class 13
Due by 8am:
Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 7, pp. 199-212, for_s_c_7_199-212.
For class: Concept 11.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 11 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 7, pp. 212-232, and complete for_s_c_7_213-232; Study Concept 12 material.

Fall Recess October 12-15

17 class 14
Due by 8am:  Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 7, pp. 212-232, for_s_c_7_213-232.
For class: Concept 12.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 12 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 8 and complete for_s_c_8; Study Concept 13 material.

22 class 15
Due by 8am: 
Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 8 for_s_c_8.
For Class: Concept 13.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 13 application note.
For next class: Writing Project-- full sentence outline w/bib DUE before noon, October 24 (email, one WORD document).

24 class 16
Writing Project-- full sentence outline w/bib DUE before noon.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 9, pp. 255-269 and complete for_s_c_9_255-269. Study Concept 14 material.

29 class 17
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 9, pp. 255-269, for_s_c_9_255-269.
For Class: Concept 14.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 14 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 9, pp. 270-292. Instead of a concept or writing about the reading, watch first half (00:00-42:00) of The Digital Nation

31 class 18
Due by 8am: first half (00:00-42:00) of The Digital Nation
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 10, pp. 293-309. Instead of a concept or writing about the reading, watch second half (42:00-end) of The Digital Nation

November

3 Extra credit 3 (pacing).

5 class 19
Due by 8am: second half, The Digital Nation.
For Class: second half, The Digital Nation.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 10, pp. 309-328 and complete for_s_c_10_309-328; Study Concept 15 material.

7 class 20
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, from Chapter 10, pp. 309-328, for_s_c_10_309-328.
For Class: Concept 15.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 15 application note.
For next class: Read Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 11 and complete for_s_c_11; Study Concept 16 material.

10 Discussion Thread, Topic Three, Due by 5pm November 10.

12 class 21
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 11, for_s_c_11.
For Class: Concept 16.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 16 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 12, and complete for_s_c_12; Study Concept 17 material.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 16 application note.

14 class 22
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 12, for_s_c_12.
For Class: Concept 17.
For next class: Study Concept 18 material.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 17 application note.

Writing Project-- Rough Draft w/bib DUE before noon November 18.  (Posted to Sakai assignment).

18 Rough Draft w/bib DUE before noon

19 class 23
For Class: Concept 18.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 18 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 13, complete for_s_c_13; Study Concept 19 material.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 18 application note.

20 Last day to drop with "W."

21 class 24
Due by 8am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 13, for_s_c_13
In class: Concept 19.
Due by 11:59pm:
Concept 19 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 14, complete for_s_c_14. Study Concept 20 material.

Extra credit 4 (pacing)
24 Discussion Thread, Topic Four, Due by 5pm November 24

26 class 25
Due by 8 am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 14, for_s_c_14.
In class: Concept 20.
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 20 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 15, for_s_c_15.html; Study Concept 21 material.

November 27-December 1: Thanksgiving Break

December

2 Individual meetings online, check Wiki for schedule

3 class 26
Due by 8 am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 15, for_s_c_15.html.
In class: Concept 21.
Individual meetings online, check Wiki for schedule
Due by 11:59pm: Concept 21 application note.
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 17, complete for_s_c_17

5 class 27
Due by 8 am: Surveillance Capitalism, Chapter 17 for_s_c_17
For class: Individual meetings online, check Wiki for schedule
For next class: Surveillance Capitalism, From Chapter 18 pp. 495-512, Full sentence outline (at least 3 main points, 3 levels deep).

8 Extra credit 5 [no credit after 8am today].
Discussion Thread, Topic Five, Due by 5pm Dec. 8.

9 Individual meetings online, check Wiki for schedule.

10 class 28:
Due by 8 am:
Surveillance Capitalism, From Chapter 18 pp. 495-512, Full sentence outline (at least 3 main points, 3 levels deep).
Individual meetings online, check Wiki for schedule.
For next class: due by 8am, December 16, Surveillance Capitalism, From Chapter 18 pp. 512-525, Full sentence outline (at least 3 main points, 3 levels deep).
Final Paper Due by 8am December 12.

12 Final Paper Due by 8am.

16 Due by 8 am:Surveillance Capitalism, From Chapter 18 pp. 512-525,Full sentence outline (at least 3 main points, 3 levels deep).

Bring your laptop computers to the final examination.

16 Final Exam, GCC 104. Face-to-Face Attendance Required. Section (1) 9-11 am Concepts 11-21.
17 Final Exam, GCC 104. Face-to-Face Attendance Required. Section (2) 9-11 am Concepts 11-21.

The Concepts

© Ed Lamoureux, 2014, 2016, 2018, 2019